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Navigation Through The Vascular System Anatomy

Navigation Through The Vascular System
Anatomy

Anatomy is inherently tied to developmental biology, embryology, comparative anatomy, evolutionary biology; and phylogeny; as these are the processes by which anatomy is generating over immediate and long timescales. Anatomy and physiology, which study the structure and function of organisms and their parts; make a natural pair of relating disciplines; and they are often studied together.

During the endovascular procedure, live data from the fiber navigation is fed into the model. As a result, the doctor views the monitor to see how the device moves through the vascular labyrinth live and in 3D. The new method uses a catheter equipped with a special optical fiber containing tiny ‘mirrors’.

Vascular system anatomy

When light passes through the fiber, the mirrors reflect a portion of the light. Whenever the fiber bends, the reflected light changes color. This is a key feature of the method, because sensors can then measure the change in color. An additional element is needed, however, for precise navigation through the vascular system. Prior to the procedure, physicians obtain CT or MR images of a patient. Based on this image data, software creates a 3D model of the vessel system and displays it on a monitor.

During the endovascular procedure; live data from the fiber navigation is fed into the model. As a result, the doctor views the monitor to see how the device moves through the vascular labyrinth live and in 3D. expend a great deal of technical effort into trying to reconstruct the shape of the entire catheter, which can be up to two meters long.

During catheter procedures

The idea is to employ various indication sounds to signal how far the next vessel junction is and in which direction the catheter should be inserted. It is similar to a car’s parking assistance system; explaining Pätz, “where you also receive acoustic indications about the distance to the next obstacle; Its goal is to support physicians by facilitating X-ray navigation during catheter procedures. For example, software can display supplementary information extracted from CT or MR images into the live X-ray image.

As a result, the MEVIS approach promises cost effective technology without special fibers and measurement systems and is less sensitive to measurement errors than previous approaches. SAFE is a Fraunhofer project with funding of 2.4 million euros. It commenced in April 2017 and will end in September 2020.