Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Prevent Pre-cancerous

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of viruses that are extremely common worldwide. The human papillomavirus vaccination are highly effective at preventing pre-cancerous cervical lesions when giving in a 3 dose schedule. One dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has comparable effectiveness to two or three doses for preventing cervical pre-cancer.

The study finding women who were vaccinating at a young age; when most had not yet being exposing to HPV; that receipt of even one dose of HPV vaccine lowering the chance of having a pre-cancerous lesion detected at cervical screening. The evidence starting to emerge that one dose of HPV vaccine may eventually prove to be sufficient for protection.performed Cox proportional hazard regression, adjusted a priori for age, socioeconomic status, and area of residence, to estimate hazard ratios of histologically confirmed CIN2/CIN3/AIS/cancer.

Vaccination prevent pre-cancerous

Vaccination is a key part of the World Health Organisation’s recent call to work towards the elimination of cervical cancer as a public health problem, together with HPV based screening, facilities for early diagnosis and treatment, and palliative care. There are more than 100 types of HPV, of which at least 14 are cancer-causing. Comparison with a historical cohort of age matched women showed that the result was not due to herd protection alone.

If one dose vaccination proves to be enough, it will really simplify our ability to protect more people against these cancer-causing viruses. The HPV vaccine has proven itself to be both very safe and remarkably effective. HPV vaccination is routinely offering free of charge to both girls and boys in early high school at age 12-13 years; with free catch up available up to the age of 19 through local doctors and clinics. Multiple sensitivity analyses, including use of different dose assignment methods, produced consistent findings.

Comparable effectiveness

Multiple sensitivity analyses, including use of different dose assignment methods, produced consistent findings. Comparison with a historical cohort of age matched women showed that the result was not due to herd protection alone. There is also evidence linking HPV with cancers of the anus, vulva, vagina, penis and oropharynx.

One dose had comparable effectiveness as two or three doses in preventing high grade disease in a high coverage setting. These findings support the hypothesis that one dose vaccination may be a viable strategy; when working towards the global elimination of cervical cancer. The effectiveness of quadrivalent HPV vaccine by number of doses against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 or 3/adenocarcinoma–in–situ (AIS)/cancer in Australia up to seven years post vaccination.