Although the success or failure of radiation therapy for cancer has long been associated with the intrinsic radio-resistance or radio-sensitivity of tumor cells, a new approach demonstrates that radiation can take credit for an additional benefit.

In the past decade, researchers Ralph Weichselbaum and Yang Xin Fu have promoted the concept that how the host immune system interacts with therapeutic radiation is just as important as radiation itself.

The cellular carnage caused by radiation attracts scavengers, such as dendritic cells. These warriors chew up radiation-damaged cancer cells and present the fragments to T cells that dismantle them.

In the September 18, 2018 issue of the journal Immunity -; available online August 28 -; the Weichselbaum-Fu collaboration demonstrates how specific interactions between therapeutic radiation and a potential patient's innate and adaptive immune responses can improve cancer treatment.

Canonical pathway and non-canonical pathway

The researchers focused on how two versions of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway respond to radiation therapy in opposing ways. NF-κB1, first described in 1986 by Nobel laureate David Baltimore, was proposed as a major regulator of the immune system's B cells.

This canonical pathway and the less known 'non-canonical' pathway -; have become a major focus for a variety of areas in biology, including inflammation, immunity, and cancer.

"Inhibiting what is known as the canonical NF-κB family has been shown to increase cancer cell killing in tissue culture and has become an area of investigation to improve cancer radiotherapy," said Weichselbaum, MD, professor, and chairman of radiation oncology at the University of Chicago.

"But despite extensive investigation earlier results from these studies failed to improve the response to radiotherapy in animals or humans," said Weichselbaum

In the current study, teams led by Weichselbaum and Fu, MD, professor of pathology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, worked with mice to show that disrupting this pathway makes radiotherapy less effective. It inhibits rather than enhances the immune system.

Instead, they found that interfering with the non-canonical NF-κB pathway improved the effects of radiotherapy by enhancing the immune system's ability to interact with radiation.

Their findings, obtained in genetic models in mice, were buttressed by biochemical studies. The results suggest novel ways to improve treatment by combining radiation and immunotherapy.

"When we irradiate tumor cells, the immune system essentially gobbles up the DNA they release," Weichselbaum said. The damaged DNA attracts a series of enzymes.

These activate a pathway called STING that recognizes viral and bacterial DNA. "We were surprised to find that it also responded to damaged exogenous DNA," said Weichselbaum.

When they blocked NF-κB, the tumors in the mice got worse instead of better. The immune system in those mice was impaired. When the researchers blocked the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, however, the animals' tumors were more easily eradicated with radiation.