All news from Physiology

Changes In Lifestyle Leads To Sleep Disorders

Changes in lifestyle like avoiding caffeine before going to bed can address sleep disorders that impair physical, psychological and social aspects of well-being. Sleep loss and sleep disorders are among the most common health problems.

Yet, they are often overlooked. It is estimated that 50 to 70 million Americans chronically suffer from a sleep disorder, which affects daily functioning as well as their health and longevity.  While 7-8 hours of sleep every day is recommended, almost 30% of Americans are sleeping 6 hours or less.

New Insights Into Gene Underlying Circadian Rhythms

Innovative cardioprotective strategies are of imminent demand. Nonfatal myocardial ischemia (MI) poses a significant risk to patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery and these non-cardiac surgeries account for around 8 million myocardial injuries per year.

Considering perioperative MI is the most common major cardiovascular complication, identifying factors that lead to cardiac disease onset and finding solutions to prevent potential cardiac damage is of critical importance.

Previous work revealed that anesthetics used in the perioperative setting alter the cellular circadian biology and furthermore, a critical role for the circadian rhythm protein Period 2 (PER2) was revealed in promoting cardioprotection through metabolic pathway mediation.

Losing One Hour Of Sleep Impact On Human Health

We all have nights where we do not get as much sleep as we would like. But missing out on even an hour can impact our health. While an hour may not really seem like a long time, 60 minutes of lost sleep can have an effect on your body.

Research has shown that an hour of sleep may cause increased appetite something like 200 more calories the day after the change kicks in as well as reduced exercise endurance and decreased productivity.

Broken Internal Clock To Offset Those Bad Eating Habits

Timing our meals can fend off diseases caused by bad genes or bad diet. Everything in our body is programmed to run on a 24-hour or circadian timetable that repeats every day. Nearly a dozen different genes work together to produce this 24-hour circadian cycle.

These clocks are present in all of our organs, tissues and even in every cell. These internal clocks tell us when to sleep, eat, be physically active and fight diseases. As long as this internal timing system work well and we obey them, we stay healthy.

Modifying Maternal Sleep Position in Late Pregnancy Through Positional Therapy

A new study suggests that an intervention to reduce supine sleep in late pregnancy may promote maternal and fetal health. Results show that the median time spent sleeping supine was reduced significantly from 48.3 minutes during the control night to 28.5 minutes during the intervention night.

The improvement was observed in both maternal and fetal parameters during the intervention night, with an increase in median minimum maternal oxygen saturation, fewer maternal oxygen desaturations, and fewer fetal heart rate decelerations. The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

New Method For Better Understanding of Circadian Rhythms

Scientists have developed a unified, data-driven computational approach to infer and reveal the connections in biological and chemical oscillatory networks that impact circadian rhythms, based on their time-series data.

Once they establish the topology of these complex networks, they can infer how cells in the network work together in synchrony, an important state for the brain. Abnormal synchrony has been linked to a variety of brain disorders, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study was published its study (“Inferring dynamic topology for decoding spatiotemporal structures in complex heterogeneous networks”) in PNAS.

Cell Connections Could Impact Circadian Rhythm

Researchers have developed a unified, data-driven computational approach to infer and reveal connections among cells in biological and chemical oscillatory networks. If you've ever experienced jet lag, you are familiar with your circadian rhythm, which manages nearly all aspects of metabolism, from sleep-wake cycles to body temperature to digestion.

Every cell in the body has a circadian clock, but researchers were unclear about how networks of cells connect with each other over time and how those time-varying connections impact network functions.

Researchers developed a unified, data-driven computational approach to infer and reveal these connections in biological and chemical oscillatory networks, known as the topology of these complex networks, based on their time-series data. The study was published in PNAS. 

Acute Sleep Loss Impact On Weight Gain

According to researchers, one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition.

In a new study, researchers demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The study was published in the scientific journal Science Advances.