All news from Pathology & Microbiology

Infections in Children Linked to Mental Illness: Study

A new study shows that the infections children contract during their childhood are linked to an increase in the risk of mental disorders during childhood and adolescence. This knowledge expands our understanding of the role of the immune system in the development of mental disorders.

Recovery from First Cough or Cold: Bacteria in Babies' Noses Could Offer Clues

New research on the types of bacteria living in babies' noses could offer clues as to why some recover quickly from their first cough or cold, while others suffer for longer. The study, published in ERJ Open Research, suggests that babies who have a wide variety of different bacteria living in their noses tend to recover more quickly from their first respiratory virus, compared to those who have less variety and more bacteria from either the Moraxellaceae or Streptococcaceae family.

More Insights into How Prions Invade The Brain

The spread of prions to the brain does not occur by direct transmission across the blood-brain barrier, according to a new study. As noted by the authors, insights into how prions enter the brain could lead to the development of effective strategies to prevent neurodegeneration, even after infection outside the nervous system has already taken place.

Neonatal Rotavirus Infection Worsened by Sugars and Microbiome in Mother's Milk

Using a multidisciplinary approach, an international team of researchers from several institutions, including Baylor College of Medicine, reveals that complex interactions between sugars and the microbiome in human milk influence neonatal rotavirus infection. Reported in the journal Nature Communications, this study provides new understanding of rotavirus infections in newborns and identifies maternal components that could improve the performance of live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines.

Senescent Cells Significantly Targeted and Eliminated with Antibiotics

ANTIBIOTICS have emerged as potentially lifespan-enhancing drugs, according to the results of new research carried out in the UK. Genetic experiments that eliminate "senescent" cells – older cells, which lose the ability to divide – have already been proven to alleviate age-related dysfunction in model organisms. Now, scientists have shown for the first time that an FDA-approved antibiotic – Azithromycin – can effectively target and eliminate senescent cells in culture.

S. aureus: Improved Infection Prevention Practices Halt the Disease Spread

Adherence to proven protocols for disinfecting surgeons' hands, patients' skin, and operating room surfaces could help to halt the spread of dangerous Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) pathogens in the operating room and beyond, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

Multi-Resistant Pathogens: Breakthrough Achieved in Decoding

Researchers at the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have achieved a breakthrough in the decoding of multi-resistant pathogens. The team led by Professor Andreas Peschel and Professor Thilo Stehle was able to decode the structure and function of a previously unknown protein used by dreaded pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus like a magic cloak to protect themselves against the human immune system. The study was published in  Nature. 

Staphylococcus aureus: The Trojan Horse Known

A weapons of Staphylococcus aureus is α-toxin, which destroys host cells by forming pores in their membranes. Researchers at UNIGE have identified the mechanism that allows these pores to be harmful. They uncover how proteins of human cells assemble into a complex to which pores are docked. They also demonstrate that blocking the assembly of the complex by removing one of its elements allows pores to be removed from the membrane and cells to survive.