Nurses

Nurses; In hospitals nurses play a critical role in promoting compassionate care for patients and families who and which are affected by alcohol use disorder (AUD), including evidence-based medication-assisted treatment (MAT) approaches; so according to a paper in the July/September Journal of Christian Nursing, official journal of the Nurses Christian Fellowship. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Nurses can reinforce

Using a compassionate, inform, and understanding approach; so nurses can reinforce the idea that AUD is a disease in need of treatment, and those afflict can be led to accept help,” writes CDR John C. Umhau, MD, MPH, CPE. He discusses the causes of and treatments for AUD including the Sinclair Method, with target use of the opioid blocker naltrexone to reduce the desire to drink.

Affecting more than 10% of the population; so AUD is the major preventable cause of death in adults under age 50. Despite the devastating effects AUD; so less than 10% of affected patients receive medically proven treatment especially early in the course of disease, when treatment is most effective.

Traditionally, treatment for AUD has focus on social and psychological support, emphasizing abstinence. A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of MAT to reduce craving and excessive consumption of alcohol; so reducing harm and promoting abstinence. Available treatments include target use of the oral opioid blocker naltrexone; also as part of an approach called the Sinclair Method.

Naltrexone before drinking

In the Sinclair method, patients take naltrexone before drinking in order; so to block alcohol’s reinforcing effect on the desire to drink. Over time, using naltrexone to block the euphoric effect of brain endorphin produces “pharmacologic extinction” of drinking behavior. Dr. Umhau writes, The gradual reduction in the desire to drink induce by naltrexone makes treatment acceptable to people who would otherwise reject help because they are not ready to give up drinking completely.

Faith base programs have a long play an important role in helping people with AUD. Although no longer overtly Christian, Alcoholics Anonymous still focuses on a higher power. Dr. Umhau notes that faith base groups “may help overcome the guilt and shame which can be severe obstacles to recovery.

The faith community has begun to recognize the important role of MAT; so to help prevent the devastating effect of AUD on family relationships. Nurses can be a powerful force in the process of recovery from AUD,” Dr. Umhau concludes. Using a compassionate, informed, and understanding approach; so nurses can reinforce the idea that AUD is a disease in need of treatment, and those afflict can be led to accept help.