All news from Ophthalmology

Study: Cannabidiol May Worsen Glaucoma

One of the most commonly proposed uses of medical marijuana is to treat glaucoma. But a study from researchers at Indiana University has found that a significant chemical component in the substance appears to worsen the primary underpinning of the disease: a rise in pressure inside the eye.

Anti-VEGF Therapy Needs More Attention

The elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) known to follow intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents may persist in individual patients, according to a report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO).

The Blood Test that Could Save Sight

A new blood test is being developed at The Australian National University (ANU) that can detect patients at risk of dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and potentially save millions of people from going blind.

Dry AMD is a common eye disorder that is caused by damage to the macular—the part of the eye that is responsible for our sharpest vision. It can take years for signs of dry AMD to be found in the eye and often by the time it is diagnosed the disease is irreversible.

Pupil Dilation Could be Key to Measuring Mental Workload

With nearly breakneck speed, the demands of work productivity in today's society seem to have increased tenfold. Enter multitasking as a way to cope with the insistence that tasks be completed almost immediately.

Previous studies on workload and productivity include physical aspects, such as how much a person walks or carries, but they do not take into account a person's state of mind. Now, MU researchers have discovered a person's eyes may offer a solution.

CHOP Celebrates EC Approval of Only Gene Therapy for Patients with Inherited Retinal Disease

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) celebrates a pivotal moment in medicine: approval by the European Commission (EC) of LUXTURNA® (voretigene neparvovec), the first and only gene therapy for patients with an inherited retinal disease, last month. This also makes LUXTURNA the first gene therapy for a genetic disease that has received regulatory approval in both the U.S. and European Union (EU)