All news from Neurology

Role of Stem Cell-Derived Neurons in Seizures and Cognitive Function

About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may develop cognitive and memory problems and depression, likely from the combination of the underlying seizure disorder and the drugs to treat it. The study is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

New Changes Occurring in the Brain in Early Alzheimer's Disease

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have discovered new changes occurring in the human brain in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers used a multiomic approach to determine RNA, protein, and phosphorylation levels and carried out further neurobioinformatic analyzes on them. The findings, drawing on data from a Finnish biobank of brain tissue samples, were published in Neurobiology of Disease.

Scientists Aim To Identify The Causes Of Dementia

Dementia is common to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Down syndrome (DS). This characteristic symptom is one of the significant causes of disability and dependency among older people. Worldwide, around 50 million people have dementia, and there are nearly 10 million new cases every year.

Understanding The Painful Event Processed In The Brain

Pain is a negative feeling that we want to get rid of as soon as possible. In order to protect our bodies, we react for example by withdrawing the hand. This action is usually understood as a consequence of the perception of pain.

A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now shown that perception, the impulse to act and provision of energy to take the place in the brain simultaneously and not, as was expected, one after the other.

Adding New Channels to The Brain Remote Control

Now one of the pioneers of 'optogenetics' and colleagues have created two new tools—protein pores which when illuminated allow Ca2+ into cells or K+ out—for switching neurons on or off using light. Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, their study shows that these synthetic 'ion channels' can be used to control specific neurons, even in live animals