All news from Microbiology

Cholera Bacterium Survives Water Predators, Mechanism Revealed

Scientists have deciphered mechanisms that help the cholera bacterium to survive grazing predators in aquatic environments. The cholera-causing bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, is commonly found in aquatic environments, such as oceans, ponds, and rivers. There, the bacterium has evolved formidable skills to ensure its survival, growth, and occasional transmission to humans, especially in endemic areas of the globe.

Soy Milk Residue Converted into Healthy Probiotic Drink

Food scientists at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have given okara – the residue from the production of soy milk and tofu, and is usually discarded – a new lease of life by turning it into a refreshing drink that contains live probiotics, dietary fiber, free isoflavones and amino acids. By encapsulating these nutrients in a beverage, they can be easily absorbed into the body, and promote gut health.

Glucose Regulose Improved With the Use of Mushroom as a Prebiotic

Eating white button mushrooms can create subtle shifts in the microbial community in the gut, which could improve the regulation of glucose in the liver, according to a team of researchers. They also suggest that better understanding of this connection between mushrooms and gut microbes in mice could one day pave the way for new diabetes treatments and prevention strategies for people.

Importance of Dental Health Detailed in Tongue Microbiome Research

Elderly individuals with fewer teeth, poor dental hygiene, and more cavities constantly ingest more dysbiotic microbiota, which could be harmful to their respiratory health, according to new research published in the journal mSphere. The findings come from a large, population-based study that identified variations in the tongue microbiota among community-dwelling elderly adults in Japan.

Drug-Resistant Bacteria: Rescuing Antibiotics' Effectiveness

Bacteria — especially Gram-negative strains — are becoming increasingly resistant to current antibiotic drugs, and the development of new classes of antibiotics has slowed.

Faced with these challenges, investigators are studying the potential of combination therapy, in which two or more drugs are used together to increase or restore the efficacy of both drugs against a resistant bacterial pathogen.

Now new research indicates that such synergy may work even when bacteria become resistant to colistin, which is considered a treatment agent of last resort.