All news from Microbiology

Infant Microbiome Development: Study Finds Three Distinct Stages

In the largest clinical microbiome study in infants reported to date, researchers explored the sequence of microbial colonization in the infant gut through age 4 and found distinct stages of development in the microbiome that were associated with early life exposures. Published in the journal Nature, their report and an accompanying report led by the Broad Institute are the result of extensive analysis of data collected from a cohort of participants involved in the TEDDY diabetes study.

Findings: Nutrient-Recycling Microbes May Feel the Heat

While microbial communities are the engines driving the breakdown of dead plants and animals, little is known about whether they are equipped to handle big changes in climate. In a new study, researchers examine what happens after microbial communities move into new climate conditions. The study is a first step toward understanding the vulnerability of these ecosystems to climate change.

Resistant Bacteria: Health Risk Posed by Vegetables and Salad

Salad is popular with people who want to maintain a balanced and healthy diet. Salad varieties are often offered for sale ready-cut and film-packaged. It is known that these types of fresh produce may be contaminated with bacteria that are relevant from the point of view of hygiene. A working group led by Professor Dr. Kornelia Smalla from the Julius Kühn Institute (JKI) has now shown that these bacteria may also include bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

Foodborne Diseases: Common Bacteria was Resistant to Antibiotics

Brazil's Ministry of Health received reports of 11,524 outbreaks of foodborne diseases between 2000 and 2015, with 219,909 individuals falling sick and 167 dying from the diseases in question. Bacteria caused most outbreaks of such illnesses, including diarrhea and gastroenteritis. The most frequent were Salmonella spp., With 31,700 cases diagnosed in the period (14.4% of the total), Staphylococcus aureus (7.4%), and Escherichia coli (6.1%). The article is published in  PLOS ONE

Salmonella Resistant to Different Classes of Antibiotics, Study

Common bacteria that causes foodborne diseases are resistant to antibiotics, according to research that identified 39 genes responsible for this resistance. Brazil's Ministry of Health received reports of 11,524 outbreaks of foodborne diseases between 2000 and 2015, with 219,909 individuals falling sick and 167 dying from the diseases in question.

Bacteria caused most outbreaks of such illnesses, including diarrhea and gastroenteritis. The most frequent were Salmonella spp., With 31,700 cases diagnosed in the period (14.4% of the total), Staphylococcus aureus (7.4%), and Escherichia coli (6.1%).

Fungal Diversity: Expansion by One Cell at a Time

Researchers have developed a pipeline to generate genomes from single cells of uncultivated fungi. The approach was tested on several uncultivated fungal species representing early diverging fungi, the earliest evolutionary branches in the fungal genealogy that provide a repertoire of important and valuable gene products.

Neonatal Sepsis: New Approach Could Save Thousands of Lives

Sepsis is a major cause of preventable death among newborn children in tropical countries. Now the antibiotic ceftriaxone, which has been available only as an injectable, can be administered through rectal delivery. This method could annually save the lives of several hundred thousand newborns with sepsis. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

K pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Infections in Children

Patients with  Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae infections had high multisystem disease / devices burden as well as exposures to carbapenems and aminoglycosides, according to research published in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal . Non-ST258  K pneumoniae  strains were more common in children, unlike in adults, whereas length of stay and mortality rates were similar across groups