Little information is available on the effectiveness of organized colorectal cancer (CRC) screening on screening uptake, incidence, and mortality in community-based populations.

"Since we launched our screening program we have seen a remarkable decline in the number of cases of colorectal cancer and related deaths across a large, diverse population," said gastroenterologist and co-lead author Theodore R. Levin, MD, clinical lead for Kaiser Permanente's colorectal cancer screening in Northern California.

CRC Screening program 

The study, "Effects of Organized Colorectal Cancer Screening on Cancer Incidence and Mortality in a Large, Community-based Population," confirms that since Kaiser Permanente Norther California's screening program for colorectal cancer was rolled out between 2006 and 2008, screening completion as recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force increased to 83% among those eligible (adults 50 to 75 years old) by 2015, compared to 66 percent nationally. In that same timeframe, new cases of colorectal cancer in the United States dropped 26%.

Researchers compared the periods before and after the organized Kaiser Permanente screening program was rolled out between 2006 and 2008. The study found that mortality from colorectal cancer decreased 52.4% from approximately 31 deaths to 15 deaths per 100,000 people; and the incidence fell 25.5 percent from approximately 96 cases to 71 cases per 100,000 people.