According to a study, the researcher estimated the total cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2017 was $327 billion, including $237 billion in direct medical costs. The study was published in Diabetes Care. To quantify the increased health resource use and lost productivity associated with diabetes in 2017.

Researchers used a prevalence-based approach to combine the demographics of the U.S. population in 2017 with diabetes prevalence, epidemiological data, health care cost, and economic data into a Cost of Diabetes Model. They use a prevalence-based approach that combines the demographics of the U.S. population in 2017

Along with diabetes prevalence, epidemiological data, health care cost, and economic data into a Cost of Diabetes Model. Health resource use and associated medical costs are analyzed by age, sex, race/ethnicity, insurance coverage, medical condition, and health service category.

Data sources include national surveys, Medicare standard analytical files, and one of the largest claims databases for the commercially insured population in the U.S. The researchers note that the total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes was $327 billion in 2017, which included $237 and $90 billion in direct medical costs and reduced productivity, respectively.

Care for people with diagnosed diabetes accounted for 1 in 4 health dollars in the United States; more than half of that expenditure was directly due to diabetes. The average medical expenditures were ~$16,750 per year for people with diagnosed diabetes, with ~$9,600 attributed to diabetes.

On average, people with diagnosed diabetes had medical expenditures about 2.3 times higher than expected in the absence of diabetes. The author said that after adjusting for inflation, economic costs of diabetes increased by 26% from 2012 to 2017 due to the increased prevalence of diabetes and the increased cost per person with diabetes.

The estimates in this study highlight the substantial financial burden that diabetes imposes on society, in addition to intangible costs from pain and suffering, resources from care provided by nonpaid caregivers, and costs associated with undiagnosed diabetes.

After adjusting for inflation, economic costs of diabetes increased by 26% from 2012 to 2017 due to the increased prevalence of diabetes and the increased cost per person with diabetes. The growth in diabetes prevalence and medical costs is primarily among the population aged 65 years and older, contributing to a growing economic cost to the Medicare program.