As our workforce ages, and become more reliant on older workers, age-related hearing loss will become increasingly important health, safety, and wellbeing issue. It is up to employers and their occupational health teams to offer better support by introducing workplace hearing screening.

There are 23.6 million people aged 50 and over in the UK – that's a third of the total population. Of these, 8.42 million of those aged between 50 and 64 work . A further 1.13 million aged 65 and over are also employed. In total, they make up 29% of "economically active" people aged 16+.

And this figure looks set to increase even more. With talk of the UK facing colossal skills gap which is dependent on older workers to fill, they are an essential workplace demographics. As a result, The need to support and invest in older workers.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

A great deal has been said about the HSE's commitment to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) caused or made worse by work. It's one focus, for example, of the "Helping Great Britain Work Well" strategy, which encourages more of Britain's employers to commit to delivering safer and healthier workplaces.

However, no research has been on the impact of age-related hearing loss among over-55s in the workplace, which is why we commissioned our own.

Tackling age-related hearing loss

The research we conducted in collaboration with OnePoll – surveyed 800 UK working adults, aged 55+, to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in the workplace and the impact it has. 

The loss in the workplace and the impact it has. We also spoke to many of our customers about what they did, their hearing had deteriorated, how they made them, and the impact they had on their working lives. Impact They had on their working lives. 

Effect on productivity and confidence

Six out of those questioned said their hearing had deteriorated in the last ten years and, worryingly, it affected their ability to do their job properly . Ten years and, worryingly, it affected their ability to do their jobproperly.

Research shows that those with hearing usually wait up to 10 years to take action. It also means that when they finally see their GP, the loss may be dismissed as an inevitable consequence of aging.

Be dismissed as an unavoidable consequence of aging And if not, they often find it more difficult to adapt to and care for their hearing devices  difficult to adapt to and care for their hearing devices.

Screening In Workplace

And with research from the Action on Hearing Loss charity suggesting that 45% of that reporting to their GPs is not referred to for additional testing, it's another reason to push for greater screening in the workplace. it's another reason to push for greater screening in the workplace .