All news from Emergency Medicine

Heart Attack Patients Get Different Treatment From EMS

Women are more likely than men to die of coronary heart disease, and past research has found that they are less likely to receive evidence-based therapies for heart attacks.

Now, researchers from the George Washington University (GW) have examined the care that women and men with heart attack symptoms receive from emergency medical services (EMS) after a 911 call and found that women were less likely to receive aspirin, be resuscitated, or be transported to the hospital in ambulances using lights and sirens.

A Potential New Way Of Treating Sepsis

Australian emergency doctors are at the forefront of a large clinical study to assess how clinicians are treating sepsis. Funded by the Emergency Medicine Foundation — Australasia (EMF) and the Gold Coast Hospital Foundation, the study will help clinicians better understand how patients in Australia and New Zealand are currently managed and could lead to a potential new way of treating the life-threatening illness.

Optimal Hypertension Treatment For Stroke Patients

Aggressive treatment of hypertension in stroke patients could do more harm than good in the long term, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Georgia. 6% of stroke patients admitted to U.S. emergency rooms have elevated blood pressure, and many studies say that having high blood pressure at the time of stroke can lead to higher rates of death and major disability.

Primary Health Care and Emergency Services in Brazil

Characteristics of primary health care and emergency services may hamper their integration and, therefore, reduce the quality of care and the effectiveness of health systems. This study aims to identify and analyze policy, structural and organizational aspects of healthcare services that may affect the integration of primary health and emergency care networks.

Simulation-Based Training of Emergency Medical Providers In USA

Training emergency medical services (EMS) workforce is challenging in rural and remote settings. Moreover, critical access hospitals (CAHs) struggle to ensure continuing medical education for their emergency department (ED) staff. This project collected information from EMS and ED providers across Nebraska to identify gaps in their skills, knowledge, and abilities and thus inform curriculum development for the mobile simulation-based training program.