All news from Cardiology

Coronary Artery Compression From Epicardial Leads

The incidence of coronary artery compression in children fitted with epicardial pacemakers may be slightly more common than previously believed. After reviewing patient records at Boston Children's Hospital, they advocate for stricter monitoring to identify patients at risk and prevent complications. The study was published in the journal HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society and the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society.

Physical Activity Modifies The Risk Of AF In Obese People

Atrial fibrillation(AF) is an irregular and often rapid heart rate that can increase the risk of stroke, heart failure, and other heart-related complications. It's more common in older people, and as it happens, in people who are obese. But new research suggests that exercise can have a moderating effect on the risk of developing this problem.

The risk of atrial fibrillation was lower the more physically active a person was. This turned out to be especially true for people with obesity. The study was published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

HIV Infection: Risk of Heart Disease is Doubled

People infected with HIV are twice as likely to suffer from heart disease, research has found. Analysis of global figures reveals that HIV-associated cardiovascular disease has more than tripled in the past 20 years as more people are living longer with the virus. The greatest impact is in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia Pacific regions, with Swaziland, Botswana and Lesotho particularly affected.

Never be Too Late to Reduce the Risk of Heart Failure With Physical Activity

By analyzing reported physical activity levels over time in more than 11,000 American adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that increasing physical activity to recommended levels over as few as six years in middle age is associated with a significantly decreased risk of heart failure, a condition that affects an estimated 5 million to 6 million Americans. The same analysis found that as little as six years without physical activity in middle age was linked to an increased risk of the disorder.

Effectiveness of Rivaroxaban Against Venous Thromboembolism

Research from the University of Warwick indicates that taking a tablet a day can help treat cancer patients of a potentially deadly condition. People with cancer have an increased risk of developing blood clots, with roughly one in five experiencing venous thromboembolism (VTE) – either deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Blood clots in the deep veins of the leg may travel to the lungs causing a pulmonary embolism. These two conditions are referred to as VTE – a dangerous and potentially deadly medical condition of which there are 10 million cases worldwide.

Regenerative Heart Valves Produced by Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

Cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers from the University of Zurich, the Technical University Eindhoven and the Charité Berlin have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.

Knocking out p63 Gene Converts Scar Tissue into Muscle Tissue in the Heart

Following a heart attack, the parts of the heart muscle that die do not regenerate into new heart tissue and instead are replaced by scar tissue. Using rodent models, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine are looking for a means to genetically convert this scar tissue into muscle tissue at the cellular level, which could ultimately be a way to treat heart attack and heart failure patients. Their latest work was published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.