All news from Bio-Chemistry

Light-induced Changes in Photosensory Proteins

Researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to demonstrate how, on a molecular level, a specific protein allows light signals to be converted into cellular information. Their findings have broadened our understanding of the way how plants and bacteria adapt to changes in light conditions, which regulate essential processes, such as photosynthesis. Their research has been published in the current issue of Nature Communications

High Yield Cell-Free Protein Expression Kit Introduced

AMSBIO introduces ALiCE® – a new high yield cell-free protein expression system. Cell-free protein expression (CFPE) is today used by protein chemists to quickly produce small amounts of proteins when screening DNA libraries. However current technologies are limited and there is a need for higher protein expression yields.

Mechanism of Gip1 Interaction with G Proteins, More Insights

Heterotrimeric G proteins are important in G protein-coupled receptor signaling, which plays many roles in the detection of various environmental stimuli, including hormones, neurotransmitters, light, smells, and chemical signals.

G protein functions are regulated by interactions with Gip1, a protein that sequesters G proteins to block signaling processes. Many studies have attempted to understand the mechanism for this interaction between G proteins and Gip1; none have provided a clear explanation, until now.

Cell Death: Key Component of Microscopic Machinery Identified

An important component of the microscopic machinery that drives cell death has been identified by Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists. Studying the 'pro-death' machinery that caused damaged, diseased or unwanted cells, the research team revealed a protein called VDAC2 was critical for the function of a key pro-death protein called Bax.

A Protein that Makes you Do the Twist: Myosin 1D

Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand. An international team has shown how a single protein induces a spiral motion in another molecule. Through a domino effect, this causes cells, organs, and indeed the entire body to twist, triggering lateralized behavior. This research is published in the journal Science on November 23, 2018.

Mechanism for Cracking Biochemical Code Uncovered

Since the time of ancient Egypt, humans have been making and breaking secret codes to retain and gain critical information. Human life itself is based upon a genetic code of DNA or RNA sequences which cells read and translate into proteins—the building blocks of life.

Recent scientific discoveries have revealed the body's mechanisms for transcribing DNA regulated by the "histone code"—different chemical marks on the tails of histone proteins, which are macromolecules within cell nuclei responsible for packaging and structuring DNA.

Role of Enzyme OGG1 in Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases

An enzyme that normally repairs damaged DNA, may be the key to a new treatment for inflammatory diseases. Inflammatory diseases such as COPD and septicemia (blood poisoning) represent a growing threat to public health. Such conditions are commonly the result of an overactive immune system.

found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a keyrole in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target of drug discovery.

Read more: https://phys.org/news/2018-11-unraveling-mystery-sperm-cells.html#jCp

Researchers have found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a keyrole in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target of drug discovery.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-11-unraveling-mystery-sperm-cells.html#jCp