According to this study, researchers decline the newest and most advanced of its kind in Chicago, cared for about two dozen patients within its first three hours. UChicago Medicine expects to begin providing adult trauma services in May 2018, pending approval by the Illinois Department of Public Health.The new ED, located in the ground floor of 5656 S. Maryland Ave., replaced the previous facility in the Bernard A. Mitchell Hospital that was built in 1983.

"It's more spacious," she said of the new facility. She used the Mitchell ED while she was pregnant, she said. "It's nice. I like all of the attention." Stephanie Brown, 19, was the first patient to be treated. She came to the ED fearing frostbite in her foot and was eventually discharged. The ED will eventually become the entry point for adult trauma patients, including those who have experienced car crashes, serious falls, major head injuries and incidents of intentional violence.

UChicago Medicine's Comer Children's Hospital will continue to provide trauma services for children with critical injuries. The $39 million adult ED is designed to improve medical care. It uses top-of-the-line equipment and a smart design, which means treatment is both faster and more private.

The facility is adjacent to UChicago Medicine's Center for Care and Discovery. That ensures efficient access to operating rooms and intensive care units. The ED also features a "rapid assessment unit," a new approach to emergency medicine where caregivers quickly assess and treat patients based on the severity of their illness or injury.

"The rapid ED is a good concept, I'm excited about it," said Christina Ochoa, RN, a staff nurse who cared for the first patients in the rapid assessment unit. "I think it will help the flow better and get patients back quicker. Instead of just waiting, they can come here and be seen faster. They'll be a lot happier."

The new ED's features also include dedicated imaging services, including a CT scanner and two state-of-the-art X-ray machines so patients no longer must share imaging services with other hospital units. UChicago Medicine team members helped direct people to the new ED. Signs posted inside and outside of the Mitchell ED will remain visible for several weeks to help guide patients and visitors to the new facility.

The emergency medicine team cared for patients. Employees working in the space had spent months training in the new location to make sure they're familiar with the layout and the new set up.

Author concludes that, the patients could treat initially have been pleased with the prompt service, and it's all going very well. The next few months are going to be very important to prepare for the immediate response that will be essential in health care. We need to fine-tune every system that we have in this operation. The challenge we have today is to keep this going.