All news from Anaesthesiology

Patients Demand Emergency Care Services In ED

The pressures of patient demand on emergency departments (EDs) continue to be reported worldwide, with an associated negative impact on ED crowding and waiting times. It has also been reported that a proportion of attendances to EDs in different international systems could be managed in settings such as primary care. This study used routine ED data to define, measure and profile non-urgent ED attendances that were suitable for management in alternative, non-emergency settings.

Potential Treatment for Disorders Involving Excess Red Blood Cells

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have cured mice with Chuvash polycythemia, a life-threatening disorder that involves the overproduction of red blood cells. They treated the mice using Tempol, an experimental drug being studied for the treatment of diabetes, cancer and other diseases. The findings offer hope that Tempol or a similar drug may treat polycythemias that affect humans, such as mountain sickness—a serious blood complication experienced in low-oxygen, high-altitude settings. The study appears in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Genetic Mutations Were Identified Associated With Nephrotic Syndrome

Researchers conducted a study, they assemble efforts in clinical and basic research on childhood nephrotic syndrome, focusing on kidney transplant patients. The aim is to identify the genetic mutation profile associated with the disease and thereby facilitate early diagnosis, providing a foundation for more accurate medical decisions and enhancing family counseling. This study was published in the journal Transplantation.

Imaging Plays Key Role in Evaluating Sports-Related Injuries

The Olympic Games give elite athletes a chance at athletic triumph, but also carry a risk of injury. When injuries occur, it is critical that they are evaluated quickly. Onsite imaging services play an important role in the management of Olympic athletes with sports-related injuries and disorders, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.