All news from Anaesthesiology

New Web-Based Game: People Motivated to Exercise More

A majority of American workers spend most of their day sitting and don't get enough exercise, putting them at risk for a variety of chronic diseases ranging from diabetes to cancer. A team of researchers at the University of Iowa has one potential solution: Turn everyday exercise into a game.

To that end, UI faculty and students designed a web-based game that can be played by anyone with a smartphone and a Fitbit. Those results were published this month in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Resolving Image In Time By Using STORM

Researchers showed a unique microscopy, Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) is one of the most widely used forms of super-resolution microscopy. Conventional microscopy is limited by the Abbe’s diffraction limit of 250 nm. This means that only objects larger than 250 nm can be resolved.

Super-resolution tools have made it possible to break the diffraction barrier and resolve objects as small as 10−20 nm. STORM, one of the super-resolution techniques invented in 2006, is based on photoswitchable fluorophore or fluorophores which emit light at different times and they are used to resolve the image in time.

Function Of Critical Immune-Surveillance Protein In Humans

Scientists have defined the structure and key features of a human immune-surveillance protein that guards against cancer and bacterial and viral infections. The identification of two human-specific variations in the protein closes a critical knowledge gap in immunology and cancer biology. The study was published in Cell.

Lung Disease and Injury: Synthetic Surfactant Could Ease Breathing

Human lungs are coated with a substance called surfactant which allows us to breathe easily. When lung surfactant is missing or depleted, which can happen with premature birth or lung injury, breathing becomes difficult. In a collaborative study between Lawson Health Research Institute and Stanford University, scientists have developed and tested a new synthetic surfactant that could lead to improved treatments for lung disease and injury. The study is published in Scientific Reports.

A Step Closer to Predict Epidemics

Ecologists at the University of Georgia have taken an important step in their efforts to develop an early warning system for infectious disease outbreaks.  A team led by Eamon B. O'Dea created a mathematical model that analyzes statistical patterns in public health reports to identify when a population is approaching an epidemic threshold—the point at which a disease outbreak is possible.

Their findings, recently published in the Royal Society journal Interface, help pave the way for a disease forecasting system that could one day be used by public health officials.

A Device To Detect kidney Stones During Spaceflights

Researchers developed a new, painless, non-invasive procedure that harnesses ultrasound technology to reposition kidney stones, in an effort to offer the sufferer quick relief, will undergo testing in emergency patients. The development and assessment of the new technology are led by the University of Washington and UW Medicine, in collaboration with other universities and agencies.

Kidney stones are an increasingly common condition that affects 1 in 11 Americans during their lifetime. The condition is even more frequently encountered in astronauts during space missions. The hope is that the new technology could benefit astronauts as well as Earth-side patients.