All news from Anaesthesiology

Spinal Anesthesia Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest following spinal anesthesia is relatively uncommon and a matter of grave concern for any anesthesiologist as well as clinicians in general. There have been, however, several reports of such cases in the literature. Careful patient selection, appropriate dosing of the local anesthetic, volume loading, close monitoring, and prompt intervention at the first sign of cardiovascular instability should improve outcomes. The rarity of occurrence and clinical curiosity of this entity suggest reporting of this unusual and possibly avoidable clinical event.

Yoga Made Safer For Everyone Using New Website

Emergency room visits for yoga injuries have increased 70% in the past five years for over 36 million Americans who practice yoga. To make yoga safer for everyone and to prevent yoga-related injuries, Loren Fishman, MD, has launched YIP-; Yoga Injury Prevention (YIP.Guru), a searchable interactive web site. This safety tool is the first and only one of its type.

Electron Microscopy Reveals The Sections Of Brain

A study showed that automated tape-collecting ultramicrotomy in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a powerful approach for volume electron microscopy and three-dimensional neuronal circuit analysis. Current tapes are limited by section wrinkle formation, surface scratches, and sample charging during imaging.

They examine that a plasma-hydrophilized carbon nanotube (CNT)-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) tape effectively resolves these issues and produces SEM images of comparable quality to those from transmission electron microscopy.

People Get Dizzy By Hearing Certain Sounds

Researchers estimated that some people, certainly sounds like a trumpet blowing a particular tone can make them dizzy, and it's not because they're giddy from a Wynton Marsalis melody. It has been estimated that 1 in 100 people around the world has a congenital inner ear condition known as semicircular canal dehiscence, a thinning of the bone enclosing the inner ear that can lead to vertigo in response to certain sounds, changes in atmospheric pressure or coughing.

It is a condition in which a person can feel the same imbalance effects of being drunk just by hearing certain tones, even from the sound of someone's voice or a musical instrument. The study was published in the Scientific Reports.