All news from Anaesthesiology

Different Kinds Of Human Cells Replace Itself In Human Body

The cells within a human body are myriad, multi-functioned, and completely distinct from one another. Different kinds of human cells replace themselves at different rates, which means the human body is comprised of cells of many different ages. The vast majority of these cells regenerate fairly rapidly, making most cells in a human body much younger than the age of the human itself.

The researcher behind a groundbreaking study that attempted to date the ages of various cells in a human body, Jonas Frisen, famously estimated that the average age of a cell in the human body is between 7 and 10 years old in a pivotal 2005 paper. The study was published in Cell.

An Enzyme Discovered In Neuron Death

Researchers have found that the enzyme histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), normally in the nucleus of cells, is also present in the axons of some neurons. When a degenerative signal is activated, HDAC1 modifies a component of a molecular motor, which then drives a signaling agent down the axon to the neuron’s cell body, killing it.

A biochemistry instructor curious about an enzyme discovered in the damaged neurons of people with multiple sclerosis made a leap toward a potential cure for countless neurodegenerative ills. 

Their paper, “Retrograde degenerative signaling mediated by the p75 neurotrophin receptor requires p150glued deacetylation by axonal HDAC1,” appears online today in the journal Developmental Cell.