According to a new study, researchers examined the efficacy of moisturizer containing 4-t-butylcyclohexanol, which acts as a sensitivity regulator, and licochalcone A, an anti-inflammatory agentfrom the licorice plant Glycyrrhiza inflata, with that of 0.02% triamcinolone ace-tonide (TA) for the treatment of facial dermatitis. The study has published in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

To compare the efficacy of moisturizer containing 4-t-butylcyclohexanol, which acts as a sensitivity regulator, and licochalcone A, an anti-inflammatory agent from the licorice plant Glycyrrhiza inflata, with that of 0.02% triamcinolone acetonide (TA) for the treatment of facial dermatitis.

This was a randomized, prospective, investigator-blinded study. Eighty participants with mild to moderate facial dermatitis were randomly treated with either the test facial moisturizer or 0.02% TA twice daily for the first 2 weeks. Forthe subsequent 2 weeks, all patients used only the test moisturizer.

Clinical assessment by investigators, bioengineering measurements, patients’ subjective evaluation, and clinical photography were performed at baseline, week 2, and week 4. Both treatments showed a statistically significant improvement with regard to physician clinical assessment, skin hydration, trans-epidermal water loss, and patient-assessed visual analog scale after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment compared with baseline.

The test facial moisturizer produced better skin hydration than TCS. The improvement in TEWL after 4 weeks of using the test moisturizer was comparable with 2-week treatment with 0.02% TA cream. However, subjective evaluation by patients indicated that TA more rapidly improved sense.

The test facial moisturizer was slower than 0.02% TA in improvingfacial dermatitis, but showed greater benefit in erythema control and skin hydrationation sensitivity. Waranya Boonchai, M.D., from Mahidol University in Bangkok, and colleagues compared the efficacy of moisturizer containing 4-t-butylcyclohexanol (a sensitivity regulator) and licochalcone A (an anti-inflammatory agent from Glycyrrhiza inflata licorice plant) to 0.02 percent triamcinolone acetonide (TA) for treating facial dermatitis in 80 randomly assigned participants.

The researchers found that compared to baseline assessments, both treatments showed a statistically significant improvement based on physician clinical assessment, skin hydration, transepidermal water loss, and patient-assessed visual analog scale following two and four weeks of treatment.

However, better skin hydration was seen with the test facial moisturizer versus topical corticosteroids. Patients' subjective evaluation demonstrated TA more rapidly improved sensation sensitivity.

Authors conclude, the test facial moisturizer was slower than 0.02 percent TA in improving facial dermatitis, but showed greater benefit in erythema control and skin hydration.