Saudi Board of Emergency Medicine (SBEM) graduates are involved in a 1-month rotation in emergency medical services (EMSs) and disaster medicine. The study evaluated the change in knowledge and attitude of EM residents after the introduction of the EMS and disaster medicine rotation. The Saudi Board of Emergency Medicine (SBEM) was created; it is considered the largest EM training program in the region. It is a 4-year program, and the goal is to graduate residents into specialists who can assume leadership roles in the field of EM.

A focused curriculum to improve knowledge and behavior has been used in other areas in the education of healthcare professionals; for example, a study about the introduction of professionalism in academic plastic surgery education showed improvement in knowledge and overall behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in knowledge and attitude of EM program residents after introducing an EMS and disaster medicine course.

The aim of the study was to assess change in knowledge and attitude of EM residents in KAMC after the introduction of an EMS and disaster medicine course. The objectives of this study were:

(1) To assess the change in knowledge of EM residents

(2) To assess the change in the attitude of EM residents

(3) To identify any knowledge gaps are imparting knowledge to the residents. 

EM residency programs are very complex, with a diversity of rotations in different departments. The delivery of the content of an EMS and disaster medicine rotation over one month requires dedication and time commitment from the educators, adding that to the educators' busy schedules due to their heavy involvement in patient care and other hospital-related tasks.

The development of an EMS and disaster medicine rotation is an important aspect of any EM training program; it was found worthwhile to analyze the change in the knowledge and attitudes of EM program residents after introducing the rotation on EMS and disaster medicine during the 1-month format. The training of emergency physicians to provide medical direction for EMS systems and care for disaster victims is a priority for the specialty, community, country, and society.

There is a paucity of literature, and hence, a comparative interpretation is not possible, however; based on the results obtained, the EMS rotation supervisors and the SBEM program should try to improve the organization of the schedule and the ambulance ride outs both on ground and in the air.

The reduced frequency of females necessitates separate studies exclusively for female population to know their view on the subject. Residents in the age group 28–30 exceeded the other respondents. This study showed that a structured course in EMS and disaster medicine had improved knowledge and had an overall high level of satisfaction among the residents of the SBEM. Although overall satisfaction and improvement in knowledge were significant, there are many areas in need of better organization.