All news from Nephrology

Candida albicans Exploits Lack Of Oxygen To Cause Disease

Scientists from Umeå university have shown how Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to harm the host. Studying adaption to hypoxic or anoxic niches is particularly fruitful, since it helps us to understand the pathogenicity of C. albicans and promotes the development of better therapy approaches. Details about the study can be found in a report recently published in the journal MBio, a publication of the American Society of Microbiology.

The Algae's Has A Third Eye, Study Finds

Just like land plants, algae use sunlight as an energy source. Many green algae actively move in the water; they can approach the light or move away from it. For this they use special sensors (photoreceptors) with which they perceive light. Scientists have discovered an unusual new light sensor in green algae. The sensor triggers a reaction that is similar to one in the human eye.

Men And Women Remember Pain Differently

Scientists increasingly believe that one of the driving forces in chronic pain, the number one health problem in both prevalence and burden—appears to be the memory of earlier pain. Research published today/this week in Current Biology suggests that there may be variations, based on sex, in the way that pain is remembered in both mice and humans.

Optimal Antibody Effectiveness: Can Be Measured By DNA Origami

Using DNA origami — DNA-based design of precise nanostructures — scientists at Karolinska Institute have been able to demonstrate the most accurate distance between densely packed antigens in order to get the strongest bond to antibodies in the immune system. The study, which is published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, may be of significance to the development of vaccines and immunotherapy used in cancer.