All news from Science and Technology

Unique Signatures of Concussion in Rugby Players, MRI Report

Using MRI to study the brains of young female athletes has helped develop an objective way to monitor a concussion injury. By using a technique that combines both structural and functional MRI information, Western University researchers were able to identify three unique signatures-one that shows brain changes after an athlete has suffered a concussion, another that can identify persistent brain changes six months after the concussion , and a third that shows evidence of concussion history.

Tuberculosis Infection Prevalent in One in Five Tibetan Refugee School Children

In a tuberculosis screening and treatment initiative covering the entire population of Tibetan refugee schoolchildren in northern India, a team directed by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Wisconsin says it has found not only a startlingly high prevalence of TB disease and infection, but also a potentially workable strategy to eliminate the disease in a large, high-risk group.

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Rates Insufficient Across EU Member States

None of the European Union (EU) Member States could demonstrate that they reach the EU target of 75% influenza vaccination coverage for vulnerable groups, according to a new report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Influenza vaccination coverage remains low in many countries, and leads to severe disease, hospitalisations and premature deaths. If no improvements in the vaccine uptake will be seen, significant burden on the healthcare systems can be expected also during this upcoming winter season.

Vaccine or Drug for Late-onset Alzheimer's, Path Suggested

UT Southwestern researchers have succeeded in neutralizing what they believe is a primary factor in late-onset Alzheimer's disease, opening the door to development of a drug that could be administered before age 40, and taken for life, to potentially prevent the disease in 50 to 80 percent of at-risk adults.

Military suicides Buffered with Strong Committed Relationships, Study

Can being in a strong committed relationship reduce the risk of suicide? Researchers at Michigan State University believe so, especially among members of the National Guard.  Suicide rates for members of the military are disproportionally higher than for civilians, and around the holidays the number of reported suicides often increases, for service members and civilians alike. What's more alarming is the risk of suicide among National Guard and reserve members is even greater than the risk among active duty members.