All news from Anaesthesiology

3D-Printed Stethoscope: Developed and Validated

A team of researchers have developed an open-source, clinically validated template for a 3D printed stethoscope for use in areas of the world with limited access to medical supplies – places where a stethoscope could mean the difference between life and death. The study is published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Colorectal Cancer: New system Provided 100% Cure

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston have developed a new, three-step system that uses nuclear medicine to target and eliminate colorectal cancer.

In this study with a mouse model, researchers achieved a 100% cure rate — without any treatment-related toxic effects. The study is reported in the November featured article in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Course of Cystic Fibrosis Predicted

Researchers at National Jewish Health have identified 10 immune-related genes whose activity during a respiratory infection predict the long-term prognosis for cystic fibrosis patients better than conventional measures.

Five years after being evaluated, patients in the lowest-risk group were all alive and doing well, whereas 90% of patients in the highest risk cluster had been admitted to an intensive care unit, put on mechanical ventilation, referred for lung transplant, had a transplant or died. National Jewish Health has applied for a patent on the 10-gene panel.

Yellow Fever in Africa Links to Climate, Environment

The burden of yellow fever in any given area is known to be heavily dependent on climate, particularly rainfall and temperature which can impact both mosquito life cycle and viral replication.

Now, researchers from Imperial College London and the WHO have developed a new model to quantify yellow fever dynamics across Africa using not only annual averages of these climatic measures, but seasonal dynamics. Their work is described in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Advanced Vaccines: Future Outbreaks Limited

Novel vaccine technologies are critical to improving the public health response to infectious disease threats that continually emerge and re-emerge, according to scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

In a perspective in The Journal of the American Medical Association, the experts highlight innovations that could significantly shorten the typical decades-long vaccine development timeline.

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis with Smart Software

Chinese scientists and clinicians have developed a learning artificial intelligence system which can diagnose and identify cancerous prostate samples as accurately as any pathologist. This holds out the possibility of streamlining and eliminating variation in the process of cancer diagnosis.

It may also help overcome any local shortage of trained pathologists. In the longer term it may lead to automated or partially-automated prostate cancer diagnosis.