All news from Anaesthesiology

Flu Shots Benefit the Asthma Patients, New Study

Asthma and respiratory viruses don't go well together. Weakened by the common cold or the flu, a person suffering an asthma attack often responds poorly to emergency treatment; some must be hospitalized. This is especially true for preschoolers.

Effectivennes of Crizotinib Against MET-Amplified Lung Cancer

The drug crizotinib has activity against a number of genetic targets relevant to non-small cell lung cancer, already earning FDA-approval against ALK- and ROS1-positive lung cancers. Now updated phase 1 clinical trial results presented at the American Association for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2018 show a 40% response rate and 6.7-month median progression-free survival from crizotinib in highly MET-amplified non-small cell lung cancer, as well.

Patients With Heart and Parkinson's Disease Benefited with Telemedicine Exercise Therapy

Anyone who gets an artificial hip or knee joint has to spend a lot of time in rehabilitation. The offers are scarce, though, and working people often cannot make the appointments due to time constraints. The result: the therapy is delayed, there are additional costs, and there is the added risk of possible health restrictions.

In the ReMove-It project, Fraunhofer and its partners have developed telemedicine-based exercise therapy that allows patients to organize their rehabilitation more flexibly. The efficacy has already been proved in a representative study, and ReMove-It is expected to be approved as a medical device by 2019.

Determination of Age by Immigration Agents X-raying Migrants

A teenager's father is murdered in Somalia, and the boy travels to the United States seeking asylum. Another teen's father and brother are murdered by extremist groups in Afghanistan and he too makes his way to the U.S. to seek asylum. Since both are minors, federal law decrees that they must be held separately from adults under the oversight of the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).

Cancer Therapy: Fulphila Biosimilar to Neulasta Approved

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Fulphila (pegfilgrastim-jmdb) as the first biosimilar to Neulasta (pegfilgrastim) to decrease the chance of infection as suggested by febrile neutropenia (fever, often with other signs of infection, associated with an abnormally low number of infection-fighting white blood cells), in patients with non-myeloid (non-bone marrow) cancer who are receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy that has a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia.