All news from Microbiology

'Painless' Adhesive Use in Biomedical Applications

Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Xi'an Jiaotong University in China have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials — such as hydrogel and living tissue — and be easily detached with a specific frequency of light.

Disruption of Circadian Rhythm: A Risk Factor for Diseases

USC scientists report that a novel time-keeping mechanism within liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted. This dual function of the nuclear receptor protein HNF4A offers a potential explanation for diseases such as diabetes and cancers. It also helps explain why such maladies are more common for people living with disrupted sleep, including night-shift workers, urban dwellers, and international jet-setters.

Treatment Of ICU Acquired Delirium Requires Personalized Approach

A population health study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Center for Aging Research has determined that haloperidol, the drug most commonly used to treat delirium in hospital medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs), did not benefit elective thoracic surgery ICU patients when given prophylactically, with the possible exception of those who have had surgery to remove their esophagus.

Heart Attack Patients Get Different Treatment From EMS

Women are more likely than men to die of coronary heart disease, and past research has found that they are less likely to receive evidence-based therapies for heart attacks.

Now, researchers from the George Washington University (GW) have examined the care that women and men with heart attack symptoms receive from emergency medical services (EMS) after a 911 call and found that women were less likely to receive aspirin, be resuscitated, or be transported to the hospital in ambulances using lights and sirens.