All news from Anaesthesiology

Haemorrhagic Fever Crisis: Africa Invests on Disease Prevention Research

In 2014, West Africa encountered its worst recorded outbreak of Ebola with over 11,000 reported deaths. The memory of this crisis hadn't faded yet when Ebola reared its ugly head again this month in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), showing up for the first time in one of the country's urban areas. Unfortunately for the African continent, Ebola isn't the only fatal disease it needs to fight.

Child Vaccination Program in Indian States, Variations in Costs Detailed

Researchers from the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy (CDDEP) have completed a study which outlines the cost of delivering routine childhood vaccines in seven Indian states.

The findings, published in the British Medical Journal Global Health, provide useful information to India's Universal Immunization Program (UIP), where the data collected can be used to accurately plan and budget. The UIP is the largest public vaccination program in the world, yet its budget is prepared based on historical expenditure data.

Medical Device Approved using Shape Memory Technology

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a medical device in humans for deliberately blocking blood flow to treat bleeding abnormalities or other conditions, a procedure known as embolization. The device integrates expanding shape memory polymer technology that was partly developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

Development of Novel Drugs for Treatment of OUD Encouraged, FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued new scientific recommendations aimed at encouraging more widespread innovation and development of novel medication-assisted treatment (MAT) drugs for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD).

The new draft guidance outlines new ways for drug developers to consider measuring and demonstrating the effectiveness and benefits of new or existing MAT products. This new draft guidance is part of the FDA's ongoing commitment to promote more widespread development, access to and adoption of MAT.

In UK, HPV Vaccines Introduced for Boys

The UK government has announced that boys in England aged 12 to 13 years are to be vaccinated against human papillomavirus, or HPV. This injection would protect them against HPV infection. HPV infection has been linked to cervical cancer in women and oral, penile, throat and anal cancer among men.

Methods to Quantify the Yips and Golfer's Cramp Uncovered

Almost every golfer knows the feeling. Minutes after a picture-perfect drive down the fairway, a cascade of inexplicable missed putts leads to a disappointing triple bogey.

Golfers' lapses in play sometimes are blamed on a mysterious twitching condition called "the yips." But are yips physical or psychological? In a new Mayo Clinic study, published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, researchers combined multiple methods to quantify golfers' yips and identify those with a neurological cause.

Lung Cancer Risk Assessment Improved by Biomarker panel

Biomarker-based risk profiling has the potential to improve lung cancer risk assessment, according to a study published online in JAMA Oncology. Florence Guida, Ph.D., from the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, and colleagues used samples from 108 ever-smoking patients with lung cancer diagnosed within a year of blood collection and samples from 216 smoking-matched controls to develop a lung cancer risk prediction model.

Hookworm Infection: Balance between Immunity and Inflammation

Hookworms infect people mostly in countries where sanitation is poor and people often walk barefoot. Working on a mouse model, a research team has studied the secretion of the immune protein RELMalpha that is triggered in the body, following infection, to protect body tissue. When the researchers knocked out RELMalpha, the mice produced super-killer macrophages that attached to the hookworm in far greater numbers. These macrophages, however, provoked increased tissue damage and inflammation.

Novel Vaccine Against Zika Virus Shows Promisisng Results

A uniquely designed experimental vaccine against Zika virus has proven powerful in mice, new research has found. A team led by researchers at The Ohio State University has developed and tested a vaccine that employs an uncommon two-pronged approach to fighting the virus, which is spread by mosquitos and is most serious for pregnant women and their fetuses.