All news from Epidemiology

Infectious Disease Outbreaks in Central Africa

The Central Africa region is experiencing rapid urbanization and economic growth, and infrastructure development. These changes, while generally positive and welcome, also make the region more vulnerable to explosive infectious disease outbreaks, according to an international group of scientists.

Sentence Reduction Affected By Mental Illness

Just last week, the Victorian Court of Appeal significantly reduced the sentence given to Akon Guide, a mother who killed three of her children after driving her car into a lake in Melbourne. The main reason for the 8½ year sentence reduction was that the trial judge had not sufficiently taken Guide's major depression into account.

Insights into Zika Mechanism, Findings

Researchers report a comprehensive analysis of interactions between Zika virus proteins and native human proteins. One of their findings gives insight into how Zika escapes immune signaling and where the virus proliferates inside the cell.

Role of HIV RNA Expression Inhibitors in HIV-infected individuals

Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity.

A new study suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). These findings appear online in the journal Nature Communications.

Genetic Engineering to Create Synthetic Microbiome

What if the bacteria that live in your gut could monitor your health, report disease, and produce beneficial molecules? Researchers have gotten one step closer to creating such a 'synthetic microbiome' by engineering different species of bacteria so they can talk to each other. Given that there are over 1,000 different strains of intestinal interlopers in the human gut, such coordination is crucial for the development of systems that can sense and improve human digestive health.

Machine Learning Model Predicts The Risk Of Death In Heart Disease Patients

A new study examines that artificial intelligence (AI) is better at predicting the risk of death in patients with heart disease than models designed by medical experts.  The study was published in PLOS One, adds to the growing evidence that AI could revolutionize healthcare in the UK and beyond. So far, the emphasis has been on the potential of AI to help diagnose and treat various diseases, but these new findings suggest it could also help predict the likelihood of patients dying too.

Artificial Intelligence Use in Metastatic Cancer Treatment

A translational research team led by the National University of Singapore (NUS) has harnessed CURATE.AI, a powerful artificial intelligence (AI) platform, to treat a patient with advanced cancer, completely halting disease progression. This new development represents a big step forward in personalised medicine.

SimpliciTB: Testing Four-Drug Regimen Against Tuberculosis

TB Alliance has initiated a pivotal clinical trial, SimpliciTB (pronounced: sim-plis-i-tee-bee), that will evaluate whether a new four-drug regimen can treat most types of tuberculosis (TB) including multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) more quickly and effectively than currently-available treatments.

The first patients have been enrolled at the National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Disease in Tbilisi, Georgia. SimpliciTB is expected to enroll 450 people with TB, including up to 150 with MDR-TB across at least 26 centers in 10 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America.

Measles: Immunization Shots found to be Effective

High fever. Cough. Runny nose. Red, watery eyes. It may not be the flu. It could be measles. Measles cases are on the rise in Europe, with more than 40,000 cases and 37 deaths in the first six months of 2018. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that they've identified 124 measles cases in 22 states and the District of Columbia this year through August.