All news from Anaesthesiology

Vision Problems In Space Can Be Avoided By Artificial Gravity

Ever since astronauts began going to space for extended periods of time, it has been known that long-term exposure to zero-gravity or microgravity comes with its share of health effects. These include muscle atrophy and loss of bone density, but also extend to other areas of the body leading to diminished organ function, circulation, and even genetic changes.

For this reason, numerous studies have been conducted aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to determine the extent of these effects, and what strategies can be used to mitigate them. According to a new study which recently appeared in the International Journal of Molecular Sciencesa team of NASA and JAXA-funded researchers showed how artificial gravity should be a key component of any future long-term plans in space.

Near-atomic Cryo-EM Imaging Of A Small Protein Displayed On A Designed Scaffolding System

Biochemists have achieved a major goal in biology: seeing at near atomic detail the smallest protein ever visualized by the technique whose development won the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry. Until now, this method has not worked with the small proteins inside cells.

UCLA biochemists have achieved a first in biology: viewing at the near-atomic detail the smallest protein ever seen by the technique whose development won its creators the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

That technique, called cryo-electron microscopy, enables scientists to see large biomolecules, such as viruses, in extraordinary detail. The research is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.