All news from Pathology & Microbiology

Staphylococcus aureus: The Trojan Horse Known

A weapons of Staphylococcus aureus is α-toxin, which destroys host cells by forming pores in their membranes. Researchers at UNIGE have identified the mechanism that allows these pores to be harmful. They uncover how proteins of human cells assemble into a complex to which pores are docked. They also demonstrate that blocking the assembly of the complex by removing one of its elements allows pores to be removed from the membrane and cells to survive.

New Test Measures Men's Fertility

At a time when more than half of male infertility cannot be explained by current methods, a new test developed by Androvia LifeSciences is able to measure male fertility. The proprietary Cap-Score Male Fertility Assay is based on research patented by the Travis lab at the Baker Institute for Animal Health and Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine and was recently the subject of a study that appeared Sept. 24 in the journal Molecular Reproduction and Development

Toxic Bullet Involved in Bacterial Competition, Study

A bacterial toxin that allows an infectious strain of bacteria to defeat its competitors has been discovered by Imperial College London scientists. The finding provides a better understanding of the mechanisms behind bacterial warfare, which is the first step to the design of improved treatments for microbial diseases.

In Never-Smokers, Obesity Linked to COPD

"Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is much more common among never-smoking older women who are morbidly obese (having a body mass index of 40 or higher) than among their female peers in the normal weight range (13.4% vs 3.5%, respectively). Morbidly obese older men who have never smoked also had a much higher prevalence of COPD than never-smoking men who were normal weight (7.6% vs 2.5%)" reported lead author Professor Esme Fuller-Thomson. 

Immunotherapy Side Effects May Be More Common Than Thought

Adverse events for immune checkpoint inhibitors used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be more common in real-world settings than reported in the clinical trials that led to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approvals, according to a study presented at the annual Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium, held from Nov. 16 to 17 in San Diego

Researchers Discover Key Gene in Cells Associated With Age-related Hearing Loss

An international group of researchers, led by Ronna Hertzano, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anatomy and Neurobiology, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), and Michael Bowl, Ph.D., Programme Leader Track Scientist, Mammalian Genetics Unit, MRC Harwell Institute, UK, have identified the gene that acts as a key regulator for special cells needed in hearing