All news from Epidemiology

Tuberculosis Infection Prevalent in One in Five Tibetan Refugee School Children

In a tuberculosis screening and treatment initiative covering the entire population of Tibetan refugee schoolchildren in northern India, a team directed by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Wisconsin says it has found not only a startlingly high prevalence of TB disease and infection, but also a potentially workable strategy to eliminate the disease in a large, high-risk group.

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Rates Insufficient Across EU Member States

None of the European Union (EU) Member States could demonstrate that they reach the EU target of 75% influenza vaccination coverage for vulnerable groups, according to a new report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Influenza vaccination coverage remains low in many countries, and leads to severe disease, hospitalisations and premature deaths. If no improvements in the vaccine uptake will be seen, significant burden on the healthcare systems can be expected also during this upcoming winter season.

Vaccine or Drug for Late-onset Alzheimer's, Path Suggested

UT Southwestern researchers have succeeded in neutralizing what they believe is a primary factor in late-onset Alzheimer's disease, opening the door to development of a drug that could be administered before age 40, and taken for life, to potentially prevent the disease in 50 to 80 percent of at-risk adults.

Military suicides Buffered with Strong Committed Relationships, Study

Can being in a strong committed relationship reduce the risk of suicide? Researchers at Michigan State University believe so, especially among members of the National Guard.  Suicide rates for members of the military are disproportionally higher than for civilians, and around the holidays the number of reported suicides often increases, for service members and civilians alike. What's more alarming is the risk of suicide among National Guard and reserve members is even greater than the risk among active duty members.

Tobacco Packing: Plain Packaging Sparked Tobacco Price Rises

The introduction of plain tobacco packaging led to an increase in the price of leading products, according to new research from the University of Stirling. The study-funded by the Cancer Policy Research Center at Cancer Research UK and published in international journal  Addiction  – conflicts with predictions made by  tobacco companies , prior to the implementation, that plain packaging would lead to lower prices and greater affordability

A Novel Way Synapses Can Regulate Neuronal Circuits, Findings

The fundamental process of information transfer from neuron to neuron occurs through a relay of electrical and chemical signaling at the synapse, the junction between neurons. Electrical signals, called action potentials, cause voltage-gated calcium channels on the presynaptic neuron to open. The influence of calcium through the channels triggers the release of neurotransmitters (the chemical messengers), which travels across the synapse to the next neuron in the relay, passing along the information.

Folate Deficiency: Unknown Problems in Connection with Cell Division

Folate deficiency can severely affect one of the most important processes in the body, cell division, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated in a new study published in the scientific journal PNAS. In the study, the researchers show that folate deficiency can cause problems in connection with cell division and DNA replication. In fact, it creates far more damaging chromosomal abnormalities than previously known.