All news from Anaesthesiology

Intentions Predicted to Help Depressed In Sri Lanka

Studies have found that although there are high rates of depression among university students, their help-seeking practices are poor. It is important to identify students who are less likely to seek the necessary help, to encourage better help-seeking among them.

This study, which was conducted among undergraduates in Sri Lanka, examined the associations between personal characteristics of the undergraduates and their intentions to seek help for depression.

CRISPR-Cas9 technology: Prediction of Cancer Mutational Signatures

Mutations driving cancer development leave behind specific 'scars,' so-called mutational signatures, in the genome. In principle, they allow for profiling of the cancer type and its development — but the noisy environment of a cancer genome makes correlations difficult. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, researchers were able to show for the first time that specific genetic alterations indeed lead to the predicted mutational signatures observed in human cancers.

Rise in Mercury Levels with Continuous Consumption of Pangasius

The pangasius, originally from Vietnam, is one of the most popular fish in the world due to its low cost, mild flavor and fillet presentation without skin or bones. It is specially requested in school canteens and senior centers. But a toxicological evaluation carried out by a team of Spanish scientists now shows that the mercury content in some samples exceeds all limits, so the consumption of other fish in the child population is recommended.

Combination Therapy Effective Against Aggressive Form of Thyroid Cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib), administered together, for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), and has a type of abnormal gene, BRAF V600E (BRAF V600E mutation-positive).

Role of FOXM1 in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is one of the most challenging and frustrating diseases that pulmonologists face. And despite affecting 1 out of 200 adults over the age of 65 in the United States, general awareness of IPF is low.

Oral Sodium Sensor Use in Hypertension Control

For people who have hypertension and certain other conditions, eating too much salt raises blood pressure and increases the likelihood of heart complications. To help monitor salt intake, researchers have developed a flexible and stretchable wireless sensing system designed to be comfortably worn in the mouth to measure the amount of sodium a person consumes.