All news from Anaesthesiology

New methods of tracking hospital nurses could help make workflow more efficient

Previous studies about nurse workflow have used time-motion study methods, which involve manually observing nurses in person or on video and then clocking how much time they spend on each task. Now, an engineer has developed a method for better tracking how nurses in an intensive care unit (ICU) spend their workday. Findings could help improve the health care delivery process in the ICU and could also be applied to other health care procedures.

Progressive kidney disease: New compound stops it in its tracks

Progressive kidney diseases, whether caused by obesity, hypertension, diabetes, or rare genetic mutations, often have the same outcome: The cells responsible for filtering the blood are destroyed. Reporting in Science, a team led by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School describes a new approach to prevent death in these essential kidney cells. Studying multiple animal models of kidney disease, the team discovered a compound that can impede loss of the filtration cells and restore kidney function. The work, inspired by an investigation into a genetic form of the condition, has the potential to affect therapeutic research for millions of people suffering from progressive kidney diseases.

Molecular mapping: A new method uncovered

Each day, every inch of skin on your body comes into contact with thousands of molecules — from food, cosmetics, sweat, the microbes that call your skin home. Now researchers can create interactive 3D maps that show where each molecule lingers on your body, thanks to a new method developed by University of California San Diego and European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) researchers. The technique is published in Nature Protocols.

Pregnant women in Sri Lanka: Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis and associated risk factors studied

Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan infecting humans and animals. Infection in adults usually causes mild disease but greater importance lies in preventing transplacental transmission which can cause major foetal anomalies and is vital to identify infection in pregnancy. Research on this regard in Sri Lanka is scarce and would be beneficial in developing antenatal care strategies for improved foetal outcome.

Walking blood banks: An immediate solution to Rural India’s Blood Scarcity

The current system of blood banks in India is such that rural patients are deprived of timely access to an adequate volume of life-saving blood, adding to preventable mortality. On the basis of an academic framework for a blood transfusion system, an alternative approach in which rural practitioners utilize unbanked blood transfusions from a voluntary pool of pre-screened donors was described.

HIV-AIDS: Way To Minimize replication Revealed

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have discovered a way to slow viral replication in the gastrointestinal tract of people infected by HIV-AIDS. The study is published in JCI Insight, this might lead to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to supplement antiretroviral therapy (ART), improving the control of viral replication in HIV-infected persons and preventing complications associated with chronic infection.